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Items tagged "Milawa Free Range Poultry":

  1. Cheats version of Hainan chicken rice, made in the rice cooker.

    I needed a quick dinner with low fuss so minced shallot and ginger and fried it off in a little lard then added some of it to chicken stock, rice and three Milawa Free Range chicken chops in the rice cooker. Then I pressed ‘cook’.

    Meantime I added minced spring onion to the rest of the ginger mix as well as salt and sesame oil to make the ‘gueng chung’ sauce.

    Next, I blanched bak choy, stir fried some veggies and made a caramel soy reduction with stock to top the chicken.

    When the rice cooker finished I left it for 10 minutes to rest, then plated up. Easy!

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  2. I’ve been researching the Eurasian food of Malaysia for work. It is a style of food that, like Hong Kong café cooking, came about when Hainan Chinese cooks cobbled together western style food from local ingredients for their Colonial British employers in the early 20th Century.

    This type of cooking made its way to the general public via small family run café’s in shop houses and eventually became an integral part of the melting pot of Malaysian culinary favourites.

    During my discovery I was beset by a craving when reminded of crisp Hainan chicken chops I’d eaten on various Malaysian holidays. Even KFC had a version over there and every hotel I’d stayed at had it on the room service menu. Ignoring the blogger style faked up recipes I came across - using all kinds of coatings like biscuit crumbs - I made a spicy one of my own device.

    Mine was served with proper chicken soup cooked rice, not the powdered stock version, and opted not to put carrots and corn in the crazy traditional onion gravy that is seasoned with Oyster sauce, Worcestershire sauce (or HP) and Ketchup. I also used homemade stock in the sauce instead the instant stuff, so it reduced down to the perfect consistency without needing a thickener.

    I marinated Milawa Freerange chicken in Myrtleford Butter Factory buttermilk, white pepper and some fiery chilli seeds. Then I ground dried garlic, curry leaves, coriander seeds, paprika, dried chilli, salt and Sichuan pepper and mixed it into a bag of potato starch. The meat was dropped into the bag and coated with the mix before par-cooking in a cast iron skillet, draining and finishing on a rack in the oven.

    Crunchy and juicy meat, crazy sauce, buttermilk poached cauliflower, perfect rice. Malaysian comfort food, quirky, spicy and addictive.

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  3. Healthy dinner: Nutty freekeh, kale & sweet corn; grilled spicy dry rubbed chicken served with fresh tomatillo, chipotle and coriander salsa with homegrown lime.

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  4. Yes it’s ‘only’ a chicken sandwich, but I won’t take it for granted.

    I baked the soft white sourdough loaf with a little oat bran and potato starch thrown in. The filling was lemon roasted Milawa Free Range chicken mixed with homemade mayonnaise and from the garden - French tarragon, lemon thyme, sorrel and chives.

    Basic. Simple. Utterly precious. Delicious. I’m truly grateful.

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  5. Masterstock cooked duck Maryland

    To me masterstock sums up the essence of years of your cooking.

    Each time I make any meat stock I add it to my masterstock. Over the years the batch has grown darker and darker. And when I cook something in this stock, the meat is removed and served, while the stock goes back to the original batch, enhanced by the additional cooking and meat juices.

    This meal of masterstock cooked Milawa Free Range duck, was flakingly soft, moist with richly flavoured meat. The duck first had most of the fat rendered from it in an iron skillet. I then submerged the marylands in a bowl of my 7 year old masterstock with ginger, star anise and spring onion, then that was placed in a steamer to cook.

    When done, I crisped the skin and made an intensely umami reduction from some of the stock. I finished the sauce with a squeeze of homegrown lime, a little sugar and poured it over fried daikon cake and Asian greens. Glorious old school Chinese cooking.

    I first wrote a post on the heritage and tradition of masterstock on Deep Dish Dreams and that contains a recipe for starting your own, along with a vegetarian variation.

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  6. Tea smoked duck & steamed barramundi cooked for friends.

    Tea smoked duck is not a dish you see often. It is claimed to have originated in central China, though you will find it listed in the cuisine of many regions. It takes up to three days to prepare if marinated to full effect, so is best left to a special occasion.

    After slow marinating in a rub of Chinese sorghum spirit, ginger and spices you air dry the duck, then blanch it to tighten the skin. This also renders some of the fat. Then you air dry it again before smoking over tea leaves, rice, sugar and cassia bark to assist the smoky flavour to penetrate the skin.

    I reduced the blanching water to a concentrate, and poured the resting juices from smoking into it to make a broth. The juices are flavoured with star anise, cassia, mandarine peel and spring onion stuffed in the duck cavity. I served this at the start of the meal.

    Next stage is steaming the duck. I added lemon to my steaming water to draw some of the more intense smokiness off the skin.

    Just before serving I rubbed the duck with potato starch and deep fried it to crisp the skin. The meat was moist and tasty. Well worth the effort.

    The barramundi was steamed and seasoned in the traditional manner, with the hot oil added from the deep fryer to sear the skin, ginger and spring onion topping.

    In the background are Mantou (Bao - steamed bread) which curiously were said to have been invented by Zhuge Liang - known as Crouching Dragon - a famous Chinese strategist and inventor who live in the 1st century AD, the Three Kingdoms period. Mantou were said to be the heads of the enemy war lords and soldiers battling in a war to unify China under their command.

    I have a porcelain statue of Zhuge Liang in my home. I knew nothing of him when I spotted the statue in a dark and dusty shop in the world heritage listed part of Hoi An in Vietnam. When I brought him home my father was amazed, he told me I had purchased a fellow strategist who loved to cook - serendipitous!

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  7. I prefer a roasted goose at Christmas it’s not as rich as duck, more flavourful and softer in texture than turkey and has its own unique flavour.

    I get the opportunity when there is just a few of us to cook for. That is when it is the meal is just for my own family. The smaller group makes it possible as the goose I get from Milawa Free Range Poultry is usually under 3kg.

    This year I rubbed it with a fragrant traditional Chinese dry rub and kept it uncovered in the fridge to dry the skin to help with the crisping process. It was basted with its own fat by pricking the skin all over to release the fat as it roasted. The key with any meat is to let it come to room temperature before roasting.

    Inside I placed my porky chestnut, candied orange zest, sourdough and fresh homegrown garden herb stuffing with pate, then sealed the cavity. The bird was roasted at a high temperature until the skin coloured, before turning down the heat and finally finishing by resting for 20 minutes before serving.

    The result was light and tasty stuffing, moist flesh and crisp skin - perfect with a Vietnamese style green mango salad and naturally, some goose fat roasted potatoes.

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  8. Here’s inside the succulent pie with a crisp buttery crust that begged for second helpings.

    I used left over Milawa Free Range fennel and lemon roasted chicken and potato, a fine onion dice, a tiny bit of Greenvale Farm bacon offcuts, a super thick bêchemel made with Schulz Organic Dairy’s milk and left over pan juice gravy from the roasted bird.

    A little extra salt and white pepper was added, but that was all that was needed to season it. The juices from the bacon meshed with the seasonings I had used to roast the bird and that was more than enough to complement the chicken flavour.

    The buttery shortcrust dough was from Pastry by Patersons and was baked for 30 minutes at 190°c - scrumptious!

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  9. Non-supermarket produce elevates a simple sandwich to an exquisite meal.

    My old fashioned chicken sandwich is how I imagine things used to taste before large scale agri biz fed us. Even then, it was probably a bit posh.

    I used leftover roasted Milawa Free Range chicken, homemade whole egg macadamia mayonnaise with dried homegrown sage & majoram, spring onion, the occasional hint of apple mint, with iceberg lettuce on sourdough wholewheat white bread.

    I ate it outside because a simple exquisite meal is often best appreciated with a backdrop of bird song and fragrant floral Spring air.

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  10. Whenever I have buttermilk I think of fried chicken, because it is the best base for a moist centered crisp coated chicken. You brine the chicken in it, then after rub the brining solution into the dredging flour to add chunks of crunch. My buttermilk came from the lovely Naomi of Myrtleford Butter Factory.

    I love spicy fried chicken so my brine contains not just herbs and pepper, but also dried Sichuan chilli’s. As a brine there is naturally some salt but I also add honey. This adds a subtle extra dimension if left overnight or longer. Some chefs might also add sugar. I put it all in a snap lock bag in the fridge, pegged dangling from a rack, for up to two days.

    When it comes to dredging I don’t use egg. The brined moist chicken pieces have the flour pressed onto the flesh. And because I Iove having lots of random crunchy bits, some of the brining solution is rubbed into my flour to form small tasty lumps that will crisp up as flavour bombs on the surface. In the flour dredging mix is plain flour, potato starch, paprika, dried homegrown thyme and parsley, more dried chilli, pepper and salt - but no glutamates like onion or garlic powder as some would do.

    I use Milawa Free Range thigh fillets that are super tasty, so I don’t want to lose the integrity of the flavour by over complicating the crust. My priorities are a crisp spicy outer that reveals silky, tender, tasty, meat. The Milawa fillets are skinless and lean but due to the brining retain lots of moisture during cooking. No stringy, tough old bird here.

    True to tradition I don’t deep fry my chicken. Instead I use schmaltz to shallow fry it in a heavy skillet until golden. Then it drains on paper towel before going into the oven on a rack at 180°c for ten minutes. As with all meat I rest it, for about seven minutes in this case.

    This chicken was great served with a thick, umami gravy made with a reduction of homemade chicken stock and the rest of the buttermilk brine, thickened by combining a little of the schmaltz mixed with flour. But you could go also for a sweet, spicy, Korean style sauce.

    With this batch I made sweet potato chips in my Air Fryer and a crisp Chinese style white sesame slaw using cabbage, white carrot, celeriac and toasted sesame in a vinegar and sesame oil based dressing.

    Each item offset the other for texture and flavour balance. The meal was neither oily or heavy but certainly had the requisite crunch, spice and necessary comfort food factor.

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  11. British Nursery Food 2. Plated up, my homemade Warialda Beef suet roly-poly studded with Pacdon Park Gammon, baby leeks and king mushrooms.

    Alongside, blanched baby Japanese turnip, radish and a homegrown baby beetroot provided crunch. The blanched turnip tops, a delicate green vegetable tossed in a few drops of olive oil went well with the pastry.

    When he saw the sauce, Mr Sticki said, “Ooh parsley sauce! I think that’s a good childhood memory, must’ve eaten a bit of it” and then ate it gleefully. I made my version with homegrown herbs, Schulz Organic milk and homemade chicken stock using Milawa Freerange Poultry bones.

    So once again, outstanding Farmers Market produce made this dead easy, old fashioned meal really truly special.

    (Taken with Instagram)

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  12. British Nursey Food. I had herbed dough left over from last night’s Warialda Beef suet dumplings so I decided to roll it out and make a bacon, leek and mushroom roly-poly. There was some onion gravy left over too so that was dotted into the mix with pieces of Pacdon Park’s superb gammon.

    It worked out perfectly. I didn’t want a soft crust so opted after it was rolled to wrap it loosely in buttered baking paper and place it in a loaf tin in a hot oven over a baking dish of water. The golden crust was assisted by a final touch of Myrtleford butter at the end of baking.

    We ate the roly-poly with parsley sauce, consisting of a velouté of Milawa Free Range chicken stock and Schulz Organic milk with homegrown herbs, for that final noshtalgic touch. And the flavour? Deeply umami with soft textures, warranting second helpings.

    (Taken with Instagram)

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  13. Cantonese home cooking - we used to eat this kind of dish for a weekend lunch or a late supper with my grandparents in Hong Kong.

    I made crisp fried noodles with Milawa Free Range chicken thigh fillets, shitake and wild fungi, gai lan(Chinese broccoli) and beanshoots. The aromatics were simply white pepper, garlic, ginger and onion. The sauce was made with gelatinous home made masterstock, mushroom stock, Chinese cooking wine, fish sauce, a splash of soy and finished with half a teaspoon of fermented bean curd. Finally I garnished it with delicious homegrown coriander leaves.

    It’s actually quite a light dish, quick to cook and very tasty.

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  14. Mr Sticki’s favourite dish made me realise that no matter how many fancy tricks we might have up our sleeves, often the simplest things are the ones we love best.

    The simple Milawa Free Range roast chicken with homegrown lemon thyme, French tarragon, lemon, butter & honey glaze is always guaranteed to make him happy.

    This time I served it with Jones Family King Edward potatoes, Mt Zero black lentils, green beans & glazed golden beetroot. Another wonderfully joyous meal wholly farmers market sourced.

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  15. A time to remember and cherish loved ones, to pay tribute to those no longer with us.

    The quiet Christmas main course: Roast goose, pan juice gravy, goose fat roasted King Edward potatoes, asparagus, cauliflower, Japanese turnips and their tops, sourdough stuffing of apple, chestnuts, onion, sage, parsley and marjoram. All the produce was sourced direct from the farmer.

    A simple execution, with beautiful flavours, shared with the most important people, family.

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