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Items tagged "Nose To Tail":

  1. Cheek by jowl. Lunch today featured Warialda Belted Galloways beef cheek. Dinner was this beautiful rare breed Greenvale Farm pork jowl.

    I marinated it in lecsó - Hungarian paprika paste - mixed with Chinese white fermented chilli bean curd which has a yielding soft cheese texture and is super umami. Just simply roasted I garnished it with Geung Chung, a Chinese ginger and spring onion relish.

    Blanched organic bak choy was seasoned with sesame oil and a teaspoon of oyster sauce, the combined juices poured into the steamed rice cooked in dashi. Quietly elegant. Very satisfying.

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  2. Here’s the pretty version of my Warialda Belted Galloways beef cheek cooked in beer with Mexican flavours.

    I served it on homemade sourdough with homegrown lime mayonnaise and sorrel from the garden. I ought to have served it in a taco but the bread was freshly baked and was crying out for company.

    The ‘recipe’ I was given to use was amusing. It was the kind of thing a head chef writes for his sous to follow, something probably only a chef could decipher as it was a four step combination with no method or ingredient list. So I made it up as I went along. And it was delicious.

    Into my pressure cooker went a whole cheek intact to be browned. Then I removed it to rest and in went a mirepoix, which I softened. The cheek and juices went back in with a stubby of beer, my homemade Warialda beef stock and half a tub of mole from Mexi Mart at Acland Cantina.

    I let the pressure cooker do it’s work - about 20 minutes under high pressure then turned it down for another 10 minutes. I switched it off and let it cool so I didn’t need to release the pressure.

    Next I took out the meat and added chopped tomatillos and a chipotle chilli, plus a tablespoon of dark brown sugar(because moles are bitter to my palate - but I’m hyper sensitive) and the juice of a ripe lime.

    When it was reduced, I sliced up the meat and returned it to the sauce to warm gently. Not a lot of effort for something really scrummy.

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  3. Offalicious Chargrilled ‘tongue bacon’ with spicy SE Asian caramel sauce on Chinese rice crackers. AKA nose to tail leftovers reinvented.

    I thinly sliced some of the pickled tongue from Warialda Beef, chargrilled it briefly so it warmed and curled seductively around its maillard stripes.

    To go with it, I made a tangy Vietnamese caramel reduction, enhanced with tamarind, fermented chilli tofu, beef stock, sugar and a small chip of Balanchan for umami.

    Placed on a crisp, light Chinese rice cracker, it was served with steamed cauliflower and last night’s leftover Chinese white sesame slaw. The over all effect - sweet, sour, spicy, crisp, yielding, delicious happiness.

    (Taken with Instagram)

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  4. Delicate Warialda Beef Belted Galloway pickled tongue with suet dumpling, onion gravy, caraway cabbage and greens. This is the soul of traditional frugal nose to tail cooking.

    The pickled tongue was poached in a stock I keep at home, made of beef bones, tendons and sinews. So both the meat and the soup are enhanced with flavour as a consequence.

    The dumplings were made in the food processor with seasoned flour, egg, chervil and grated Warialda suet - the beef fat from around the kidneys. They were boiled in the stock after the tongue was cooked. And the onion gravy was made with both the same gelatinous stock and a clove studded onion that was in the stock with the tongue.

    Even the cabbage was cooked with the stock, carraway seeds and a splash of home made chardonnay vinegar. I added a home grown baby beetroot and leaves to the plate too.

    This was a meal I enjoyed so much I went back for seconds of meat and gravy. The tongue was silkily tender with a beautiful subtle taste. This is Slow Food at its most honest. This is also modern first world waste repackaged and holding its own as nostalgic comfort food. 

    (Taken with Instagram)

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  5. Soul Food sandwich. My low and slow pulled pork trotters in gelatinously rich BBQ sauce with crisp lemon slaw on sourdough. Leftovers and cheap cuts of meat can be a really, really good thing and these textures and flavours balance well.

    (Taken with Instagram)

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  6. My homemade phó bò viên prior to mixing. And yes that’s a piece of beef tendon near the lime.

    My stock uses Warialda Belted Galloway beef bones, sinews and tendons with cassia bark, star anise, brown cardamon, fennel seeds, charred ginger, shallots and more aromatics.

    I cook it for more than 24hours and always includes some of the previous batch mixed in which adds a deeper note of flavour.

    (Taken with Instagram)

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  7. The healing meal mixed and ready to slurp. Homemade phó bò takes a long time to cook but is all natural, uses medicinal Asian herbs and spices along with parts of the cow first world countries throw away. But it is one of the most wonderful, heady, nutritional dishes you can eat without feeling bloated.

    (Taken with Instagram)

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  8. Soft, crisp, gelatinous, salty, sour, sweet, chewy. To the Chinese, balance is mandatory to the perfect meal.

    On Saturday I parked in the oven a Warialda Belted Galloway Beef cheek in Chinese millet vinegar and leftover Vietnamese pho soup with a dice of daikon and onion, star anise, mandarin peel, and Sichuan pepper. It cooked for three hours on low heat. It came out wonderfully rich and gelatinous, but outside of a traditional Chinese meal with a bowl of rice and side dishes, I wasn’t quite sure how else to serve it.

    But tonight I realised that because it was a North/Central Chinese style dish it would be a perfect companion to the Flower Thread Mantou, a traditional version of the steamed rice flour bun made popular by NYC Chef David Chang of Momofuku). The Flower Thread bun is rolled into a scroll and can contain shallots. I had some in the freezer, as they can readily be bought in Chinese grocery stores. I then added some fresh spring onion to relieve the gelatinous intensity against the soft, faintly sweet, yielding bread.

    To balance it, I added crisp, creamy Warialda sweetbreads rolled in homemade breadcrumbs made by blitzing some leftover crusts in the food processor. Super fresh sweetbreads are easy to prepare, remove any suet (fat) from around them, then soak the creamy bundles in salted water for an hour and drain before cooking. My tip is to refrigerate the crumbed morsels for at least 10minutes before shallow frying.

    The vegies included some home grown salad greens, a sweet blanched homegrown baby beet and a mini Japanese turnip. I just put them in a container of boiling water and cover with a lid. No stovetop cooking required.

    Sounds complicated? No, it was dead easy. I did it all sitting down in my tiny kitchen. Being composed of ‘nose to tail’ style secondary cuts and home grown vegetables it was really flavourful and kinder on the budget than prime cuts. As Mr Sticki says “Looks like restaurant food….but it’s is better than a bought one”. Homecooked Slow Food rocks.

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  9. Introducing some other contributors to another one of my blogs - foodfeedblog:

    Chris Badenoch and Julia Jenkins first met on Season 1 of Masterchef Australia and very quickly realised their joint passion for all things food (and beer).

    The concept for their restaurant Josie Bones was born over the lamentation that, there’s far too many prime cuts and glasses of wine being served in restaurants in Australia – what about the unpopular stuff? And the beer? Will somebody please think about the beer!

    So Josie Bones opened in late 2010 as a haven for lovers of great local and international craft brews, and seasonal, local and entire beast focused eats.

    As well as the birth of their first brainchild, both have been busy cooking, eating, experimenting and drinking – for research purposes of course.

    Chris has released a cookbook called The Entire Beast (shot by the now-familiar Adrian Lander and styled by the lovely Kyle Barrett), Julia has presented on cooking show Delish.

    Both competed on Iron Chef Australia cooking with - of all things - chocolate. And there has been writing for various publications, travelling around the country doing cooking demonstrations, drinking a truckload of awesome beer, and have generally having a great time jumping in, with both feet deep into the Australian food industry.

    Josie Bones is located at 98 Smith Street, Collingwood, Victoria – it can safely be said it has probably the best beer list in the country. So here on Food Feed Blog, they’ll give you a taste of those myriad beers on offer.

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