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Items tagged "curry":

  1. Vietnamese style curry using Plains Paddock lamb. Some roasted cauliflower seasoned with cumin seeds and ground coriander.


    Vietnamese curry like this would most often use goat meat but works well with the excellent flavour of Anna’s lamb. It robustly stands up to the black cardamom and star anise in the masala. I cooked it with coconut water so it could also be ideal for those avoiding dairy or choosing low fat meals.

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  2. Macau style curry. When my Dad was a child his family had homes in Tai Po, on Hong Kong Island and a Summer house in Macau. They made and traded spirits and liquors keeping a large warehouse in Macau and in China, exporting all over the world.

    One of my great aunts married into a Meccanese family and I guess bits of their food culture drifted into my paternal family’s diet via my grandfather’s passion for ‘the exotic’ to his mind.

    The curries of Macau are mostly masala’s with coconut milk. Some mix it with a rempah but mostly they are Eurasian in form - or early fusion - created by the Portuguese traders who made Macau their base and traded in the East Indies for spice, a precious commodity to Europeans of the 1700’s & 1800’s.

    This pork mince curry with green beans, onion and tomato is typically cooked with coconut milk. I finished it with Thai basil & VN fish sauce, my own touch. Serving it with steamed Black Pearl blend rice: Long Grain Brown Rice, Black Barley, Daikon Radish Seeds.

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  3. My simple Lao style pumpkin dish. I cooked butternut pumpkin in watered down coconut milk with a tiny bit of palm sugar, and a splash of fish sauce.

    It was seasoned with dry aromatics that I ground myself. It was a mixture of lime leaf, coriander leaves, lemon grass, pink peppercorns, ginger and garlic.

    When ready I topped it with some coconut cream, fresh coriander, spring onion, and Vietnamese mint. The finishing touch was a scattering of basil flowers from our garden.

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  4. Got to love a Sri Lankan family hopper feast.

    Hoppers - crisp, wafer thin bowl shaped pancakes made from a fermented rice flour batter, traditionally using coconut water - are eaten at any time of the day. Some are plain, others have a whole egg at the bottom. Here they’re surrounded by rich southern curries, sambols and chutney. It’s a meal fairly undiscovered by Aussies.

    My Lankan friends say the scarcity of good Sri Lankan restaurants is due to most of them never meeting the standard of home cooking. I’ve observed that there is a family palate of preference for certain flavours. Each traditional curry would differ from household to household. And it is my suspicion that is why everyone but Sri Lankans seem to frequent these venues.

    I’m lucky that an old friend is a Burgher and one of her beautiful children is my Godson. I have embraced the culture as part of the family and stayed with them when they lived in Sri Lanka.

    Their annual hopper feast consists of a hiring a hopper chef and the extended family bringing curries. About fifty of us sat down to egg hoppers, plain hoppers, 2 sambols, my dry chilli and lime leaf infused peach chutney, and about a dozen curries including mutton, pork, seafood, vegetarian, and beef. We were truly spoilt. Happy tummies.😍

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  5. My lips stung with pleasure.

    Sometimes Thai food can make your face burn like you’ve been in a kissing marathon.

    A Som Tam (ส้มตำ) style green papaya salad was made because we ate a slice of my homemade mango & passion fruit cream sponge for afternoon tea. I rarely eat creamy food - so a dinner that stirred the metabolism was in order.

    Papaya contains enzymes that can aid digestion and I find it helps soothe my gut after eating very rich food.

    The Som Tam dressing satisfied my need for sharp, clean flavours with home grown limes, garlic, shallots, tamarind, chilli, dried shrimp, lemongrass, palm sugar and fish sauce.

    A few crisp fried dried shrimp and anchovies plus crushed peanuts added crunch, another layer of texture to the salad.

    On the side I made a fiery kaffir lime leaf curry using Hartdale Park Venison that made sweat bead on my nose and brow. Naturally I used home grrown lime leaves for the full effect. All up, a deliciously lean and exhilarating culinary ride!

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  6. I find it’s hard to photograph curry. So often it looks unappealingly fecal. My apologies that this doesn’t look as tasty as it actually was.

    It’s my curry of Farmer Joe’s goat neck and blanched mustard greens with chapatti. Yes, the sustainable crusade continues with another meal that demonstrates that it’s both economical and delectable cooking with first world waste.

    I seared it in a cast iron pan then pressure cooked it, seasoned with my rempah, coconut milk and dessicated coconut in a rendang style, but as it was unseasonably cold weather I decided to pick up the heat a notch and add some hot Seychelles curry powder, curry leaves and a touch of tamarind.

    It was an excellent internal heater and very satisfying to eat despite its looks.

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  7. I made one of my favourites, fragrant Sri Lankan parippu (dhal) with some pumpkin and green beans. It’s flavoured with coconut milk, curry leaves, turmeric, ginger, mustard seeds and pandanus. After you eat this particular dish so many restaurant lentil curries taste like mud by comparison.

    Served with rice, chutney and pappadams it can also make for a wonderful vegetarian meal. We ate it with a rich Vietnamese Bó Kho and paratha, quite an Asian fusion of flavours.

    To make Parippu you can use either moong dahl (yellow split peas) or red lentils.

    In a claypot, first I fry mustard seeds in ghee. Fresh curry leaves go in just before putting in the lentils, a knotted pandanus leaf, grated fresh turmeric and water. If you have it, you can use coconut water instead.

    When the lentils are soft I pour in enough coconut cream to make a velvety finish and stir in some steamed pumpkin pieces. It’s that simple.

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  8. Everyone loves lamb, and it has become expensive. Even lamb shanks, once considered the domain of the poor, are fashionable and costly.

    But it has opened the door to one of my favourite things to eat - goat. Like venison and kangaroo it cannot be cooked in the manner of other meats. Goat needs steam to cook and in return you are rewarded with delicate flavour and texture.

    Here is my newly discovered delectable goat shank curry, cooked in the pressure cooker then finished in the oven. Magic, soft and rich it’s one of my favorites, that calls for a pillow of naan to dredge in the sauce.

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  9. Sometimes I get a chicken curry craving. Sometimes it is Macau style, sometimes Indian, Sri Lankan, Thai or Seychelles. But the produce is always Milawa Free Range poultry.

    Tonight was a south east Asian style similar to Indonesian and Malaysian curries. The rempah is made with fresh shallots, roasted chilli and garlic, pounded with the roots of ginger, coriander and turmeric, that I keep on hand in the freezer.

    Once that’s in the pan with onion, chicken and potato, curry leaves are added. And next, roasted pungent balanchan - a flavour which dominates until the simmering is finished - then tamarind and coconut cream are added and warmed through before serving. At that point it comes together in a kind of chemical masterstroke, leaving a curry that makes you want to keep eating it long after you’re full.

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  10. Homecooked Seychelles Creole style chicken and cashew curry seasoned with tomato, coconut, ginger and tamarind; dahl and parathas.

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  11. Roti Canai with ayam gulai, beef rendang, assam fish curry, channa dahl masala at Chilli Padi Mamak Kopitiam.

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  12. Roti Jala at Chilli Padi Mamak Kopitiam.

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  13. Chilli Padi Mamak Kopitiam’s ayam percik, a deep, rich chicken curry.

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  14. Chillipadi Mamak’s Malaysian Ribena longan drink served in a jar as per traditional Hawker drinks.

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  15. Delicious Murtabak, spicy chicken stuffed roti with curry dipping sauce, at MY Restaurant in Windsor.

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