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Items tagged "homecooked":

  1. Avert your eyes vegetarians. A beautiful ethically produced, grass fed, dry aged, rare breed Warialda Belted Galloway beef porterhouse steak. I rarely eat prime cuts so this super tasty steak was an extremely rare treat, served well rested at blue to rare.

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  2. Bottled gold, my homemade lemon curd.

    LEMON CURD RECIPE:

    3 lemons
    100g butter (80g if using an artisan butter like Myrtleford Butter, I prefer unsalted)
    225g white sugar
    2 eggs, beaten

    Pare the lemon rind thinly in large pieces with a potato peeler. Remove any pith from the back as the pith will add bitterness. Squeeze lemons and strain.

    In a bain-marie (double boiler - I sit a mixing bowl over a saucepan of simmering water, or if quadrupling the quantity, suspend a stockpot over another deeper stockpot) melt the butter. Remove from heat and add sugar, juice, peel, beaten eggs, mix well to combine.

    Return to heat and stir until it starts to thicken. Lift out the lemon peel and keep cooking until creamy, velvety thick and coats the back of a spoon.

    It can be thinned with water, I like mine a little concentrated for adding to custards and creams for desserts or cakes.

    If your eggs are super fresh it will develop small white flecks or lumps. This is the congealed egg white protein (albumen) which can be strained off. To avoid this if using home laid or free range farmer direct, use eggs that are 10 days at least since laying. In supermarkets the eggs may already be this old on purchasing.

    Sterilize jars by rinsing with boiling water, shake with lids on and then dry, with lids off upside down. They can be a little damp when you pour in the curd.

    If you want to keep the jars of lemon curd long term, place them lidded tightly in a saucepan half filled with water and simmer until an airlock is formed.

    Take them out to cool. The lids will pop, sucking them down tightly sealed, then store away from light and heat. I’ve kept them 12 months this way, they will also keep long term in the fridge.

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  3. Autumn comfort, thick homemade congee with tofu skin, dried scallop, fish balls, pork floss and a little fish sauce. Because I can.

    My grandmother ate congee instead of steamed rice with meals when she was elderly, “Less fattening”, she said. The combo of twice daily Tai Chi exercise plus low carb, high protein diet possibly helped her get rid of both her Parkinson’s Disease and Diabetes.

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  4. Offalicious! Brain Bombs. Creamy and crunchy, two of the things our palates love most.

    My crisp Panko crumbed bits of lamb brain, seasoned in one of my homemade sweet sour dry rubs and potato starch, crumbed and fried until golden. Dipped in a hot sour sauce to balance the palate.

    Celebrate the life given to sustain you by using as much as you can in beautiful ways, wasting nothing.

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  5. I made too much dinner. Much, much, much too much food. Looks like we have a couple of days leftover Pad Thai coming up. Actually considering the weather forecast, leftovers will be quite welcome

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  6. Macau style curry. When my Dad was a child his family had homes in Tai Po, on Hong Kong Island and a Summer house in Macau. They made and traded spirits and liquors keeping a large warehouse in Macau and in China, exporting all over the world.

    One of my great aunts married into a Meccanese family and I guess bits of their food culture drifted into my paternal family’s diet via my grandfather’s passion for ‘the exotic’ to his mind.

    The curries of Macau are mostly masala’s with coconut milk. Some mix it with a rempah but mostly they are Eurasian in form - or early fusion - created by the Portuguese traders who made Macau their base and traded in the East Indies for spice, a precious commodity to Europeans of the 1700’s & 1800’s.

    This pork mince curry with green beans, onion and tomato is typically cooked with coconut milk. I finished it with Thai basil & VN fish sauce, my own touch. Serving it with steamed Black Pearl blend rice: Long Grain Brown Rice, Black Barley, Daikon Radish Seeds.

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  7. Homemade Okonomiyaki - oh my! Belly pork, cabbage, sweet potato, pickled ginger, garnished with black sesame, bonito, homegrown perilla and spring onion

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  8. I wanted a Niçoise salad but had no tuna. I had Rookwurst. It actually worked well. Goose fat seasoning on the potato’s wasn’t half bad either 😉

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  9. I learned this favourite dish from Dad. He calls it Jin Ha Luk.

    Prawns are dusted with potato starch and fried at really high heat so that you can crunch through the shells. Then they’re coated in a spicy, sticky tomato sauce.

    I use my homemade smoked rocoto chilli sauce in it. Making it hot, sweet, smoky and umami in one, with crunch revealing yielding sweet Australian prawn meat.

    I don’t make it very often but I really love it.

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  10. Offalicious. Crisp fried Gypsy Pig ears scented with mandarine, seasoned with Merkén & Sriracha salt. A New Year treat with a glass of The Hills cider.

    I used the same spice mix on popcorn with Myrtleford butter last night. It’s a bit addictive.

    Merkén. a Chilean Mapuche spice blend, is smoked ground goat horn chilli with cumin & coriander.

    Sriracha salt is easy to make by mixing Thai Sriracha chilli sauce into coarse salt and drying it out. I mixed the two seasonings, adding a tiny amount of caster sugar to the blend.

    The resulting seasoning would also be a good BBQ meat rub or added to baked potato’s.

    My tip for crisping the ears and reducing spatter is to dry them uncovered in the fridge after softening them in the pressure cooker. Then roll the pork in potato starch and rice flour before frying in a heavy skillet of hot oil.

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  11. Homemade Clafoutis (baked fresh cherry and almond vanilla custard) in a shortcrust, topped with almond pistachio praline.

    The cherries were purchased at farm gate, the butter, eggs and cream from farmers markets. Delicious - I took it to a dinner with friends, it finished the meal off well.

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  12. Keeping it simple on Boxing Day, I managed to bake a wonderful asparagus quiche.

    After blind baking the pastry I added sautéed red onion, small Pacdon Park lardons pieces, red onion, Weyhill Farm garlic to the combo with a mix of proper free range eggs, Schulz Organic Farms bath milk and a little grated Parmesan.

    30 minutes later it was ready. Served with a sprinkling of truffle salt and foraged pink pepper, homegrown greens and a glass of Moores Hill 08 unwooded Chardonnay from their cellar door. Mr Sticki ate half the quiche!

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  13. Christmas dessert: Cherry Ripe.

    But first, after the Christmas roast goose we ate aged Pyengana Cheddar, Berrys Creek Kooraman Blue and King Island Brie with Mejdool dates and glacé ginger. We drank a Moores Hill sticky purchased at their cellar door.

    I had a box of cherry seconds for making jam so made stewed fruit with some, finishing them with a little Cointreau.

    Dad contributed with his intensely flavoured super creamy coconut ice cream and chocolate rum ice cream. A perfect finish for our festive feast.

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  14. Simple & lean: Local Victorian Hakubaku organic udon with seared Hartdale Park venison rump, Sōsu, garlic pickled organic daikon, Swiss Brown mushroom, Chuka Wakame and Gai Lan

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  15. Quiet home dinner. Soy sauce chicken with the traditional geung chung (minced ginger, spring onion)

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