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Items tagged "noodles":

  1. I made too much dinner. Much, much, much too much food. Looks like we have a couple of days leftover Pad Thai coming up. Actually considering the weather forecast, leftovers will be quite welcome

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  2. Simple & lean: Local Victorian Hakubaku organic udon with seared Hartdale Park venison rump, Sōsu, garlic pickled organic daikon, Swiss Brown mushroom, Chuka Wakame and Gai Lan

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  3. I shed my South East Asian tendencies and went healthy Northern Chinese tonight. Boiled pork and shrimp dumplings with a salad of buckwheat soba, seaweed, homegrown mustard greens and a chilli black sesame dressing. Maximum thrust umami!

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  4. Chinese comfort food. Black bean @warialdabeef Girello on crunchy crisp noodles.

    I marinated 150g of shredded Girello in 3 teaspoons of a rough paste of salted black beans with garlic, 2 tablespoons of cornflour, a splash of light soy sauce, a teaspoon of sugar and a tablespoon of minced ginger soaked in rice wine.

    I fried off a sliced large onion half, took it out of the wok and then browned the beef. Next in went sliced carrots, two ladlefuls of my concentrated homemade gelatinous beef stock, half a teaspoon of oyster sauce, a minced garlic clove and 2 teaspoons of finely ground Sichuan pepper.

    When the sauce thickened, I threw in a bunch of homegrown bak choy, homegrown garlic chives and a generous splash of Vietnamese fish sauce. Crisp egg noodles were warmed through in the oven to receive this sauce, creating both crisp and soft umami noodles. Wonderfully satisfying!

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  5. Easy home cooking. Crisp Cantonese layers of textures.

    It took me a long time to learn how to pace stir frying on a piss-weak home stove so that I got my textures right without stewing. I had to give up my wok for a cast iron skillet and developed a technique of staggering cooking times for the ingredients. But I nailed it eventually.

    Here crunchy egg noodles are a bed for shitake mushrooms, Gypsy Pig sirloin schnitzel, crisp celery, choi sum, bean shoots.

    The sauce of homemade stock, Chinese cooking wine, white pepper, light soy and oyster sauce gradually softened the noodles.

    My aromatics started with onion and garlic then at the finish included ginger, spring onion and fresh coriander. Plate licking good.

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  6. Because we love to eat crunchy crisp noodles, I made black bean @warialdabeef popes eye, Asian greens and red peppers to go on them.

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  7. Cold meal. Hot day. Zaru soba with sashimi.

    Green tea soba mixed with julienned homegrown shiso (perilla), then dressed with mentsuyu. On the side, shaved cucumber, watercress. Raw trout from Yarra Valley Salmon with crackling made from the skin and a little wasabi.

    Yummy clean Japanese flavours of Australia.

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  8. The @WarialdaBeef Girello Challenge part 3. How I made bún bò Huế. Spicy beef noodle soup.

    Again this post shows how to use rare breed Belted Galloway Girello without roasting or corning it. And by using a few thin slices of it per person along with some budget Asian smallgoods and a secondary cut of pork, it becomes an economical and tasty way to make your delicious farmers market purchases go further.

    This wonderful meal originates in Vietnam’s Imperial City Huế. It is a beef stock flavoured with chilli, lemongrass, shrimp paste and coloured with annatto. I leave the colouring out, but you can add paprika for colour instead if you want the traditional red hue to the soup.

    The toppings include fresh beef, slices of Cha Lua Hue - a peppery Vietnamese Mortadella type pressed meat - and pork trotters. In mine there is finely sliced Girello and beef tendon meatballs too.

    Naturally fresh Asian herbs are included such as coriander and perilla, Vietnamese mint, rice paddy herb etc. It comes down to what you have, but bean shoots are usually in the mix. Thinly sliced onion or spring onion are also commonly used too.

    Some Asian grocers sell jars of bún bò Huế paste and stock cubes to help speed up the process if you don’t have phò, stock and the right seasonings in your pantry.

    To make the soup from scratch, I use my Warialda beef phò as a base and into it I add a ladleful of my master stock(optional), and smoked pork trotters. Seasonings are lemongrass and chilli - both dry roasted - plus a tablespoon of stinky shrimp paste - aka balanchan.

    Once in, I leave it all to simmer until the flavours infuse, about 30mins, then season with a little rock sugar and light Vietnamese fish sauce from Phu Quoc, not the heavy Thai version. When it’s ready I strain out the lemongrass and trotters.

    Meanwhile the noodles are boiled separately for 10 minutes. These are dried rice vermicelli that are the same round thickness of spaghetti.

    To serve it’s just a matter of assembling the parts. Into each person’s bowl go the noodles and then an arrangement of the meaty goods and greens on top. I included some of the flesh from the trotters. Then ladle in the soup. Serve with a squeeze of lime and extra chilli - fresh, oil or relish - on the side, then slurp, slurp, slurp!

    Vietnamese soup noodles seem to fill you with energy and this one is highly recommended if you have a cold. Enjoy!

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  9. The @warialdabeef girello challenge: Beef Char Kway Teow. How To.

    Our friend, rare breed beef farmer Alan Snaith of Warialda Belted Galloways handed Mr Sticki a Girello Roast at St.Kilda’s Veg Out farmers market and told him to relay to me that he challenged me to cook it - but not as a roast.

    Now I love Girello, particularly for corned beef as well as roasting, but I also love to apply lateral thinking. So I was definitely up for the challenge .

    But I’ll start with a little bit of background on Girello for you first. As a kid I remember it as topside, eye round (UK) or silverside. Girello is the Italian name for the cut, it is very lean and comes from the thigh near the rump.

    In my childhood it was known for being cheaper yet full flavoured, a hard working cut of beef. But now in this era of prime cut recipes, less people are aware of its potential. So over the week, I’ll make a few dishes with this one piece to show you how much mileage you can get for your money.

    As a tasty and economical cut, it lends itself to either very brief cooking, like stir frying or low and slow cooking in dishes like the Sicilian Falsomagro, a rolled pot roast stuffed with Mortadella. I believe in Italy it is also used for Bresoala - dry cured beef, which can also be purchased from Warialda.

    So my first thought was how to use it in Asian cooking. I fancied fried noodles and remembered having enjoyed a Halal beef version of the popular Malaysian hawker dish Char Kway Teow which traditionally uses prawns, pork sausage, chilli and lard. So I retained the pork and subbed prawns with beef. For extra vegetable content and texture I also used daikon cake. Certainly not traditional but a very tasty combination.

    After the basic prep of chopping the ingredients, this dish takes only a few minutes. Using beef takes a little longer as it needs to rest in the middle of the process. But that gives you time to blanch some Asian greens as a side dish.

    If you have strong gas pressure or a wok burner at your disposal and a stainless steel wok, that’s all you will need on the stove. I have weaker gas so use a non stick wok plus a cast iron skillet for the items that need high heat. If you have an electric stove you may also need to follow my technique.

    First take some fresh thick cut white rice noodles known as Hor Fun, the packet may say “for stir frying”. For three adult servings I used half the packet and immersed them in a bowl of boiling water. This allows you to separate the strands. You may need to use your fingers to assist this once the water has cooled a bit.

    Then from the narrow end of the girello, take very thin slices, sliding the knife across any sinew and removing it in the process. For this dish I used just a handful of sliced meat.

    I also sliced half a medium sized brown onion and two dry cured Chinese pork sausages known as Lup Cheong. Four garlic shoots were cut into short pieces, three slices of daikon cake were cubed and a handful of bean shoots set aside.

    I cooked the dish in pork fat as per the traditional, I took a 10cm x3cm piece of Greenvale Farm back fat and diced it and rendered it in the cast iron skillet over medium heat.

    When the dice had shrunk, released their fat and were slightly golden I turned up the heat to high before charring the Lup Cheong and then adding the onion to soften.

    Next went in the daikon cake cubes and when they had formed a fried crust, I quickly tossed the beef in until browned, then added two tablespoons of Sambal Oelek - a chilli onion relish and stirred it through. Store bought sambal is fine and you could also go for sambal badjak, although homemade is also lovely.

    The skillet came off the heat and I deglazed it with a few splashes of the water the noodles were soaking in. Enough to loosen any stray tasty, crunchy bits stuck to the pan. Then left it to rest.

    Meanwhile I loosened the noodles and blanched my side dish of greens.

    I warmed my wok and added some more fat. I have a reserve of smoked lard for hawker dishes but canola or peanut oil would be fine instead. When it was hot the noodles went in to warm.

    Now the seasoning - two tablespoons of light soy and one of dark. Stir it through the noodles until they are colored. Then push the noodles to one side of the pan and crack in an egg, scrambling it before mixing into the noodles. Season with a generous shake of white pepper.

    Add in the contents of the skillet and the garlic shoots. When they are warmed through, taste for seasoning.

    It may require extra salt or in my case I add light Vietnamese fish sauce and if you prefer it spicier add more chilli - you can use fresh or pickled, or even sauces. Thai Sri La Cha works well. Then stir through the bean shoots and serve. I took my blanched greens and warmed them briefly in the hot wok before placing at one end of my platter with the noodles.

    If I was feeding four adults I would have made extra vegetables and rather than make extra noodles, would prepare another simple side dish like roti paratha to dip in a small dish of curry sauce, some spicy achar salad or even make a few satay.

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  10. Spaghetti carbonara made with farmer direct produce is the tastiest meal you’ll make with just five core ingredients.

    But this one was exceptional because I used Greenvale Farm’s jowl bacon which has a smoky umami quality and a dense grain making only a fraction of the usual amount of bacon necessary to fill the dish with a heady flavour and smell.

    They say Carbonara is a Roman dish named for a political group the Carbonieri. Traditionally guanciale - cheek and jowl bacon is used.

    So for two of us I chopped up three pieces of the bacon and added a few tiny cubes of smoked trotter meat and cooked them in a cast iron skillet over low heat. It is important to use the bacon fat as it is where much of the flavour is. I find it is also fundamental to the chemistry and doesn’t make the dish at all oily if the technique is done correctly.

    When the bacon was browned and the pan oily, half an onion, finely diced, was added. This takes up some of the fat. When the onion was softened I deglazed the pan with the starchy water used to cook the spaghetti.

    I added the cooked spaghetti to the skillet and stirred in a couple of tablespoons of densely silky Schulz Organic cream and two more spoons of starchy water to coat the strands.

    Once incorporated and still on low heat I poured in three fresh, heavy farmers market eggs that had been beaten in a small jug before adding. I raised the heat slightly and kept moving the pasta until it was coated with cooked egg. Then it was seasoned with white pepper. Salt wasn’t necessary as there was sufficient in the bacon cure.

    This gorgeous pasta dish didn’t need parmesan - that would have been overkill to a perfectly balanced dish. Garnished with parsley and dill, second helpings beckoned and were irresistible. Mr Sticki had four helpings.

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  11. My homemade phó bò viên prior to mixing. And yes that’s a piece of beef tendon near the lime.

    My stock uses Warialda Belted Galloway beef bones, sinews and tendons with cassia bark, star anise, brown cardamon, fennel seeds, charred ginger, shallots and more aromatics.

    I cook it for more than 24hours and always includes some of the previous batch mixed in which adds a deeper note of flavour.

    (Taken with Instagram)

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  12. The healing meal mixed and ready to slurp. Homemade phó bò takes a long time to cook but is all natural, uses medicinal Asian herbs and spices along with parts of the cow first world countries throw away. But it is one of the most wonderful, heady, nutritional dishes you can eat without feeling bloated.

    (Taken with Instagram)

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  13. This wasn’t the absolute best Char Kway Teow I’ve had but it wasn’t oily, had decent quality ingredients and good flavour. Besides, at $10 inclusive of a beverage I couldn’t complain, especially as I was full after eating only a third of it. Luckily Mr Sticki had the appetite to finish it off for me.

    We ordered it at Grain Asian in Box Hill which is a venue on the fringe of a food court. There’s table service but you pay the staff when they take the order.

    (Taken with Instagram)

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  14. Cantonese home cooking - we used to eat this kind of dish for a weekend lunch or a late supper with my grandparents in Hong Kong.

    I made crisp fried noodles with Milawa Free Range chicken thigh fillets, shitake and wild fungi, gai lan(Chinese broccoli) and beanshoots. The aromatics were simply white pepper, garlic, ginger and onion. The sauce was made with gelatinous home made masterstock, mushroom stock, Chinese cooking wine, fish sauce, a splash of soy and finished with half a teaspoon of fermented bean curd. Finally I garnished it with delicious homegrown coriander leaves.

    It’s actually quite a light dish, quick to cook and very tasty.

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  15. Wat Tan Hor is a Chinese Malaysian noodle dish made with wide rice noodles in a thick, rich, clear sauce that is finished by swirling egg through it.

    This version is from the cheap, quick service Malaysian restaurant chain Pappa Rich, new to Melbourne but beloved to many in Malaysia.

    While this dish wasn’t as good as the one on offer at Laksa Me or Chilli Padi, it was serviceable, inexpensive and still open after 10pm on a Monday night - when we were desperate for a meal after going to the theatre.

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