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Items tagged "offal":

  1. Offalicious! Brain Bombs. Creamy and crunchy, two of the things our palates love most.

    My crisp Panko crumbed bits of lamb brain, seasoned in one of my homemade sweet sour dry rubs and potato starch, crumbed and fried until golden. Dipped in a hot sour sauce to balance the palate.

    Celebrate the life given to sustain you by using as much as you can in beautiful ways, wasting nothing.

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  2. Offalicious. Crisp fried Gypsy Pig ears scented with mandarine, seasoned with Merkén & Sriracha salt. A New Year treat with a glass of The Hills cider.

    I used the same spice mix on popcorn with Myrtleford butter last night. It’s a bit addictive.

    Merkén. a Chilean Mapuche spice blend, is smoked ground goat horn chilli with cumin & coriander.

    Sriracha salt is easy to make by mixing Thai Sriracha chilli sauce into coarse salt and drying it out. I mixed the two seasonings, adding a tiny amount of caster sugar to the blend.

    The resulting seasoning would also be a good BBQ meat rub or added to baked potato’s.

    My tip for crisping the ears and reducing spatter is to dry them uncovered in the fridge after softening them in the pressure cooker. Then roll the pork in potato starch and rice flour before frying in a heavy skillet of hot oil.

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  3. Cheek by jowl. Lunch today featured Warialda Belted Galloways beef cheek. Dinner was this beautiful rare breed Greenvale Farm pork jowl.

    I marinated it in lecsó - Hungarian paprika paste - mixed with Chinese white fermented chilli bean curd which has a yielding soft cheese texture and is super umami. Just simply roasted I garnished it with Geung Chung, a Chinese ginger and spring onion relish.

    Blanched organic bak choy was seasoned with sesame oil and a teaspoon of oyster sauce, the combined juices poured into the steamed rice cooked in dashi. Quietly elegant. Very satisfying.

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  4. Here’s the pretty version of my Warialda Belted Galloways beef cheek cooked in beer with Mexican flavours.

    I served it on homemade sourdough with homegrown lime mayonnaise and sorrel from the garden. I ought to have served it in a taco but the bread was freshly baked and was crying out for company.

    The ‘recipe’ I was given to use was amusing. It was the kind of thing a head chef writes for his sous to follow, something probably only a chef could decipher as it was a four step combination with no method or ingredient list. So I made it up as I went along. And it was delicious.

    Into my pressure cooker went a whole cheek intact to be browned. Then I removed it to rest and in went a mirepoix, which I softened. The cheek and juices went back in with a stubby of beer, my homemade Warialda beef stock and half a tub of mole from Mexi Mart at Acland Cantina.

    I let the pressure cooker do it’s work - about 20 minutes under high pressure then turned it down for another 10 minutes. I switched it off and let it cool so I didn’t need to release the pressure.

    Next I took out the meat and added chopped tomatillos and a chipotle chilli, plus a tablespoon of dark brown sugar(because moles are bitter to my palate - but I’m hyper sensitive) and the juice of a ripe lime.

    When it was reduced, I sliced up the meat and returned it to the sauce to warm gently. Not a lot of effort for something really scrummy.

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  5. A Lao and Thai inspired dish.

    Aromatic meatballs made with Warialda Beef popes eye, sinews and tendons with Greenvale Farm pork fat. I fried them with eggplant and three kinds of basil from my garden, fresh coriander, then dressed it with prik nam pla.

    The meatballs were made by cooking the beef, sinews and tendons in masterstock with cassia, star anise, brown cardamon, Kampot pepper and ginger before mincing and forming the balls. No further seasoning required.

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  6. It’s been unseasonably hot this Autumn and salads have been the cool option for meals. So with the North African and Middle Eastern recipes of Yotam Ottolenghi’s Mediterranean TV show percolating in my subconscious, I made this.

    A salad of Northern beans onion and farro cooked in homemade chicken stock, mixed with vegetables from my garden: fragrant perilla, sharp sorrel, colourful beetroot leaves, San Marzano tomatoes and roasted red peppers.

    The flavour packed Warialda Belted Galloways beef tongue is dressed with greek yoghurt blended with roasted pepper, lemon juice, sumac, cumin and cardamon with a dash of orange blossom water.

    On the side I served my homemade sourdough bread with local olive oil and spicy dukkah. Eaten in the garden it felt almost like a Summer holiday meal.

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  7. I liken my cooking to living in the poorest house in the best street in town. I cook cheap ingredients & offcuts that I purchase from top primary producers favoured by restaurants.

    This penne was topped with goulash. Ingredients included homemade Lecsó made from capsicums found on a neighbour’s discarded bush dumped in our lane. A glug of homemade passata and a garlic clove.

    The meat was Warialda beef sinews & tendons, pope’s eye, a Greenvale Farm smoked trotter & bacon offcuts. Plus stock made with all of the above as well as a smoked duck frame.

    I may be cheap, but the food here is sure tasty.

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  8. Deep fried duck egg on braised beef cheek with barley on sourdough.

    The rich cheek meat was very slowly cooked with Jerez vinegar, homemade stock and passata to a sticky glaze. I finished it with a little splash of chipotle sauce for a slight kick and dressed the egg with my Uyghur salt and crisp deep fried shallots.

    The thick yolk melded with the braise and the sourdough offered a chewiness accented by crisp egg whites and shallot.

    And in case you thought I was a hero whipping this up for a late lunch, the braise came out of my freezer, made it back in Winter. I just happened to have some oil at hand in the deep fryer so it all fell together very easily.

    It really pays to freeze leftovers. For me, eating something months later is more pleasurable than eating something you’ve tasted a few times while cooking, because later, your palate’s fresh when you come to it.

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  9. Crisp, crunchy, rich porky ears of wonder. Because we’rer a nose-to-tail household we respect the life of the animals we eat by including offal, so as little is wasted as possible. Pigs ears are delicious treat fried like this and dusted with my spicy cayenne salt.

    I pressure cook the ears in my homemade stock then dry them out and cool them. Usually I leave them for 24 hours to firm up, then chop and fry them in a hot iron skillet. The oil tends to spit so if doing a large batch I’ll use my covered deep fryer.

    When they’re done they dance with my freshly ground cayenne salt which includes coriander, cumin, allspice, cayenne, smoked paprika, sugar and more. Finger licking good.

    (Taken with Instagram)

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  10. Bao-wow-wow! Sticky chipotle pork in a steamed bun. Smoky, spicy and luscious, served with steamed garlic shoots.

    More like Granny Noshtalgia than ‘Dude Food’, as the pork came from a hock, and small gelatinous Greenvale Farm maple basted trotters provided the sticky texture.

    Another adventure into simple, economical and resourceful eating, old school style.

    (Taken with Instagram)

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  11. My peasant style Ma Po Tofu features shitake, wood ear fungus, eggplant, garlic shoots, Greenvale Farm pigs tongue, pork fat and a small amount of fermented chilli bean curd for a richer flavour. The secret ingredient is my dark, intense, homemade masterstock. This dish is internal central heating, perfect for winter.

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  12. The Gold Coin Slider. Awesome, if I say so myself.

    Anthony Kumnick of Greenvale Farm knows I love an offal challenge. Australia is so prime cut focussed that I have devoted myself to showing how secondary cuts of meat should not go to waste, but can be a delicious and economical part of our diet.

    So Anthony gave me some pig snouts to play with. After a bit of head scratching I resurrected an old Chinese barbecue recipe called gold coin chicken, which actually uses pork offal.

    The name is derived from old Chinese coins that characteristically had a square hole in the centre. Creating the coins, a skewer goes through alternate rounds of marinated lean pork meat, pigs liver and slices of fat.

    In my case I used pork liver from my usual Viet/Shanghai butcher, Anthony’s snouts, pig cheeks and back fat. The cheeks and snouts were first pressure cooked in my master stock before marinating.

    Pigs liver is rich and strong tasting, so I started by soaking them in salt water with mandarin peel, then slicing to add to the marinade. The marinade is Cha Sui style. I used Dad’s recipe, learned when he trained to be a Chinese Roast meat specialist.

    The back fat was steamed then sliced and alternated with the other items on a long skewer. I grilled them first on medium heat then finished on high to crisp the edges, basting frequently with marinade.

    When this was done cooking I basted it all with honey, though Dad’s recipe uses maltose instead. As always with meat, I then rested it off the skewer and tossed it in its juices before serving.

    To complete the dish I steamed mantou buns and garlic shoots. Mantou are easy to make and freeze but are also available frozen in Asian Grocers. This ‘burger’ style is a new addition to the many available, I’m presuming David Chang may have created a demand for them commercially.

    The meat was tender and tasty. The rendered pieces of pork fat giving an extra richness against the pâté textured liver and gelatinous snout that crisped around the edges. The garlic shoots acted as a relief and textural foil. In season, cucumber would also be an ideal accompaniment.

    Essentially this bears a similarity to a Cha Sui Bao, but lifts it to the sophisticated level you might expect from a restaurant like Golden Fields or Momofuku Seiōbo. But it’s cheap and easy enough to cook for yourself.

    Try it - you can cheat by using a jar of Lee Kum Kee Cha Sui marinade and a slug of gin in the mix instead of Chinese rose liquor. Use slices of any lean, secondary cut of pork and why not save the smoky fat from bacon to use in between? Offalicious!

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  13. Offalicious Chargrilled ‘tongue bacon’ with spicy SE Asian caramel sauce on Chinese rice crackers. AKA nose to tail leftovers reinvented.

    I thinly sliced some of the pickled tongue from Warialda Beef, chargrilled it briefly so it warmed and curled seductively around its maillard stripes.

    To go with it, I made a tangy Vietnamese caramel reduction, enhanced with tamarind, fermented chilli tofu, beef stock, sugar and a small chip of Balanchan for umami.

    Placed on a crisp, light Chinese rice cracker, it was served with steamed cauliflower and last night’s leftover Chinese white sesame slaw. The over all effect - sweet, sour, spicy, crisp, yielding, delicious happiness.

    (Taken with Instagram)

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  14. Delicate Warialda Beef Belted Galloway pickled tongue with suet dumpling, onion gravy, caraway cabbage and greens. This is the soul of traditional frugal nose to tail cooking.

    The pickled tongue was poached in a stock I keep at home, made of beef bones, tendons and sinews. So both the meat and the soup are enhanced with flavour as a consequence.

    The dumplings were made in the food processor with seasoned flour, egg, chervil and grated Warialda suet - the beef fat from around the kidneys. They were boiled in the stock after the tongue was cooked. And the onion gravy was made with both the same gelatinous stock and a clove studded onion that was in the stock with the tongue.

    Even the cabbage was cooked with the stock, carraway seeds and a splash of home made chardonnay vinegar. I added a home grown baby beetroot and leaves to the plate too.

    This was a meal I enjoyed so much I went back for seconds of meat and gravy. The tongue was silkily tender with a beautiful subtle taste. This is Slow Food at its most honest. This is also modern first world waste repackaged and holding its own as nostalgic comfort food. 

    (Taken with Instagram)

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  15. Soft, crisp, gelatinous, salty, sour, sweet, chewy. To the Chinese, balance is mandatory to the perfect meal.

    On Saturday I parked in the oven a Warialda Belted Galloway Beef cheek in Chinese millet vinegar and leftover Vietnamese pho soup with a dice of daikon and onion, star anise, mandarin peel, and Sichuan pepper. It cooked for three hours on low heat. It came out wonderfully rich and gelatinous, but outside of a traditional Chinese meal with a bowl of rice and side dishes, I wasn’t quite sure how else to serve it.

    But tonight I realised that because it was a North/Central Chinese style dish it would be a perfect companion to the Flower Thread Mantou, a traditional version of the steamed rice flour bun made popular by NYC Chef David Chang of Momofuku). The Flower Thread bun is rolled into a scroll and can contain shallots. I had some in the freezer, as they can readily be bought in Chinese grocery stores. I then added some fresh spring onion to relieve the gelatinous intensity against the soft, faintly sweet, yielding bread.

    To balance it, I added crisp, creamy Warialda sweetbreads rolled in homemade breadcrumbs made by blitzing some leftover crusts in the food processor. Super fresh sweetbreads are easy to prepare, remove any suet (fat) from around them, then soak the creamy bundles in salted water for an hour and drain before cooking. My tip is to refrigerate the crumbed morsels for at least 10minutes before shallow frying.

    The vegies included some home grown salad greens, a sweet blanched homegrown baby beet and a mini Japanese turnip. I just put them in a container of boiling water and cover with a lid. No stovetop cooking required.

    Sounds complicated? No, it was dead easy. I did it all sitting down in my tiny kitchen. Being composed of ‘nose to tail’ style secondary cuts and home grown vegetables it was really flavourful and kinder on the budget than prime cuts. As Mr Sticki says “Looks like restaurant food….but it’s is better than a bought one”. Homecooked Slow Food rocks.

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