install

Items tagged "pasta":

  1. How do you give fettuccine Carbonara super umami without processed seasoning? I think I may have nailed it.

    I had my beautiful Melbourne Community farmers’ markets sourced produce as always, including a slightly more unusual one - Greenvale Farm tongue bacon. But I wanted to push the boundaries a little more

    So I cooked my fettuccine in a broth made with dried Chinese fungi and kelp. It worked. Aside from that there was nothing out of the ordinary in the cooking, but it had that incredible plate licking umami and we didn’t even think to want Parmesan.

    Fresh ingredients: Golden Yolk eggs, Weyhill Farm garlic, Faranda onions and a splash of raw Schulz Organic milk, Jonella asparagus, Greenvale farm lard.

    Bookmark and Share
  2. Been a crazy few days, needed a quickie comfort meal, enter my Veg Out farmers’ market friends’ produce. Felicity’s @tmhpastas fried gnocchi, Jimmy’s @pacdonpark lardons, Anthony’s @greenvalefarm chorizo, some peas, pumpkin and homegrown garlic shoots fried in Naomi’s @thebutterfactor butter. Thank you lovely ones xxxx

    Bookmark and Share

    Tags

  3. I worked late. Mr wanted spaghetti Bolognese. I had penne, Gypsy Pig spicy minced pork and some Warialda Belted Galloways Girello.

    So it hit the pan with onion, garlic, homemade heirloom passata, dried homegrown basil, parsley and oregano, homemade beef stock and a small piece of dried ham rind.

    While stirring my sauce I was having SMS conversations with 3 clients. Some days are just silly like that. I find it amazing I can actually make something edible when so distracted.

    So, a crazy day finished late with a comforting dish garnished with lashings of parmigiana reggiano and eaten with feet up in front of the telly. Aaaah!

    Bookmark and Share

    Tags

  4. Spinach ravioli, nettles, onion, pumpkin, nutmeg, @thebutterfactor buttermilk, Parmesan - comforting Winter food.

    Bookmark and Share

    Tags

  5. I had lots of leaves. Some growing from an organic daikon, an enormous swede and lots of homegrown radishes. Most people would throw them out. Or may be compost them. But I opted to make my ‘poor man’s pesto’ with them.

    It’s just like regular pesto, only the majority of the leaves are not basil. Not that you’d know. Even with only 20% of it being basil picked just prior from my garden

    I tossed it through orrechiete, with homemade chicken meatballs, some peas and a garnish of Jamon. Easy. Delicious. Cheap. And I still have two big jars of the pesto.

    Bookmark and Share

    Tags

  6. Preservative free and yet so colourful because it’s fresh.

    @tmhpastas sundried tomato gnocchi served with fried chunks of @greenvalefarm jowl bacon, onion, capers and tons of my homegrown oregano and lemon basil.

    The sauce was made by frying off heirloom tomatoes I had bottled, with garlic in olive oil and finishing it with some water from the pasta and a little chipotle for a kick. Scrummy and easy.

    Bookmark and Share

    Tags

  7. I liken my cooking to living in the poorest house in the best street in town. I cook cheap ingredients & offcuts that I purchase from top primary producers favoured by restaurants.

    This penne was topped with goulash. Ingredients included homemade Lecsó made from capsicums found on a neighbour’s discarded bush dumped in our lane. A glug of homemade passata and a garlic clove.

    The meat was Warialda beef sinews & tendons, pope’s eye, a Greenvale Farm smoked trotter & bacon offcuts. Plus stock made with all of the above as well as a smoked duck frame.

    I may be cheap, but the food here is sure tasty.

    Bookmark and Share

    Tags

  8. I taught Mr Sticki how to make Potato Gnocchi from scratch.

    He chose to fry it and we made a sauce using home made dried tomato’s, garlic, onion and herbs from the garden.

    A little wild rocket, some parmesan - really simple vegetarian fare that beckoned seconds.

    Bookmark and Share

    Tags

  9. Because sometimes there’s an itch you just have to scratch. Spaghetti Bolognese using @greenvalefarm pork & @Warialdabeef, home canned tomatoes and my own passata, homegrown herbs, onion and organic pasta. Simple, uncomplicated, basic magic. (Taken with Instagram)

    Bookmark and Share

    Tags

  10. Spaghetti carbonara made with farmer direct produce is the tastiest meal you’ll make with just five core ingredients.

    But this one was exceptional because I used Greenvale Farm’s jowl bacon which has a smoky umami quality and a dense grain making only a fraction of the usual amount of bacon necessary to fill the dish with a heady flavour and smell.

    They say Carbonara is a Roman dish named for a political group the Carbonieri. Traditionally guanciale - cheek and jowl bacon is used.

    So for two of us I chopped up three pieces of the bacon and added a few tiny cubes of smoked trotter meat and cooked them in a cast iron skillet over low heat. It is important to use the bacon fat as it is where much of the flavour is. I find it is also fundamental to the chemistry and doesn’t make the dish at all oily if the technique is done correctly.

    When the bacon was browned and the pan oily, half an onion, finely diced, was added. This takes up some of the fat. When the onion was softened I deglazed the pan with the starchy water used to cook the spaghetti.

    I added the cooked spaghetti to the skillet and stirred in a couple of tablespoons of densely silky Schulz Organic cream and two more spoons of starchy water to coat the strands.

    Once incorporated and still on low heat I poured in three fresh, heavy farmers market eggs that had been beaten in a small jug before adding. I raised the heat slightly and kept moving the pasta until it was coated with cooked egg. Then it was seasoned with white pepper. Salt wasn’t necessary as there was sufficient in the bacon cure.

    This gorgeous pasta dish didn’t need parmesan - that would have been overkill to a perfectly balanced dish. Garnished with parsley and dill, second helpings beckoned and were irresistible. Mr Sticki had four helpings.

    Bookmark and Share

    Tags

  11. Last night’s homemade fried potato gnocchi with Warialda Beef ragú, plated up all pretty by Mr Sticki (Taken with Instagram)

    Bookmark and Share

    Tags

  12. More seated cookery. Some leftover mashed potato became gnocchi. Some leftover Warialda Belted Galloway roast beef became ragú that I cooked gently with onion, homemade passata and my own beef stock. By that stage my dicky ticker had left me out of breath, so Mr Sticki fried the gnocchi and plated up. (Taken with Instagram)

    Bookmark and Share

    Tags

  13. It’s been a extraordinarily tough week, climaxing with a death in my family. I was in need of comfort food. Something a little bit naughty.

    So alongside a huge salad of producer direct sourced rocket, mustard, chervil, oak leaf lettuce and watercress - dressed with a classic honey vinaigrette - I opted for creamy pasta. Something we usually steer clear of.

    Here’s my Fettucini with polpetini made with Greenvale Farm Toulouse sausage meat, formed into tiny meatballs and sautéed with onion, garlic and pine forest mushrooms.

    I deglazed the pan with the pasta water, then added Schultz Organic cream and homegrown sage and French tarragon. The dish was finished with white pepper and grated nutmeg. It really hit the spot.

    Bookmark and Share

    Tags

  14. We don’t eat pasta often so it is quite a treat. Here’s my organic Spaghetti with a ragoût of rare breed pork, Red Deer venison and some shredded beef that was extracted from 6 week dry aged bones I had used to make stock. Homegrown herbs were used as well as my homemade passata. True Slow Food that’s worth the effort with every mouthful.

    (Taken with instagram)

    Bookmark and Share
  15. Another vegetarian meal, albeit a rather clunky version of a meal I occasionally make. This rib sticking potato gnocchi with cavalo nero and Gorgonzola was made from scratch at 10pm after finishing work.

    I put too much flour in the gnocchi dough and then forgot to fry them. I put too much butter in the pan and had to use some flour. I forgot to blanch the kale. What was I thinking, attempting this when exhausted? Fortunately it tasted good, that’s something at least…zzz.

    Bookmark and Share

    Tags