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Items tagged "secondary cuts":

  1. Most people have no idea how to cook goat meat. They’ve a tendency to cook it like lamb but goat is so very lean that treating it like lamb will make it tough and tasteless.

    The secret is cooking with moisture, in this case steam. I seared Farmer Joe’s goat loin rack in a hot cast iron pan, then transferred it to a rack in a moderate oven over a pan of water. Then it was rested for ten minutes.

    The seasoning was a little Warialda beef dripping, mustard, coarse salt and fresh sweet majoram. It was served with a jus made with master stock, pan juices and prune jelly.

    I made a soft, truffled mash with Gordon Jones’ Knox potatoes and Shultz Organic cream, garnished with cauliflower. On the side, Glenora’s Daikon crossed Japanese turnip and blanched turnip tops. Meat and white vegetables!

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  2. My first attempt at calzone, filled with chunky Warialda Beef brisket ragù, served with a quinoa accented garden salad.

    I threw out the pizza dough quite thin and wound up with a tiny hole in each but the minor leakage of filling in the oven wasn’t an issue. It tasted great.

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  3. I think people underestimate the power that lies in making simple choices. But every groundswell starts with one person’s decision to choose to say no or to change their pattern of behaviour.

    2011 has been marked as the year of the protestor. That doesn’t just mean those who’ve joined rallies. Protest can be by simply making a choice, by avoiding something, not endorsing something, not buying something, by breaking a cycle, changing habits or lending support to causes that aim to sustain the planet and create a pathway to a brighter future. It doesn’t need to be dramatic, just sincerely committed.

    In my own way, I protest the waste we produce in the first world by choosing produce and cuts of meat that aren’t fashionable, the secondary cuts, offal and the rare breeds facing extinction in the face of the mass market breeds that grow fast and cheap but need a ridiculous amount of seasoning to be even remotely as tasty.

    I protest by choosing to buy and grow heirloom fruit and vegetables, the old breeds that taste intense, grow slowly but don’t look pretty enough for the supermarket buyers. I make as much food from scratch as possible from farmer direct, loose and unpackaged goods. I can fruit and vegetables myself and makes jams, relishes, mayonnaise, pickles etc, avoiding the packaging and chemicals involved in most supermarket sourced food that we take for granted today.

    But I know I’m not alone in this. More people are choosing to invest in the future of the planet by living sustainably and making choices that buck the mass trend. We also eschew the two supermarket chains that control the hardware, liquor and gambling markets in Australia and who hold our primary food producers to ransom.

    It’s really easy to do this, you just need to break your usual cycle, it means moving out of your comfort zone to create new habits. For example, we buy direct from producers and local manufacturers - and yes, that even includes bedding, clothing, soap, washing powder and toilet paper. We shop from small independent businesses, go to markets, repurpose items - rather than buying new - and we always try to buy sustainable and ethical goods.

    Give it a go. Make a committed choice and help change the world for the better.

    (via potentialitea)

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  4. The Caen ox trip en cocotte, smoked bacon, onions, aged vinegar at Wayside Inn is a rich and gelatinously sticky braise with big beefy flavours. The crumbed crust was a good textural foil. In fact I think without it I might have found it too overwhelming to get beyond half way.

    Our waitress described the dish with “You wouldn’t know it’s tripe” which is great if you’re squeamish about offal. But that hasn’t ever worried me. It sat very well with a glass or two of the Melbourne microbrew, 3 Ravens Ale.

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  5. I’m a Slow Food supporter & I try to live sustainably within an urban environment.

    My philosophy as an omnivore is waste nothing.If you harvest an animal for meat you respect it by using every part of it. That includes offal, sinews, tendons, fat and bones.

    This is Warialda Belted Galloway pressed tongues, they send them to Tassie to be produced and the result is a delectable, light slab of cured pink beefiness.

    I served it on bread sauce made with crumbs from homebaked bread and rich, Schultz Organic milk. I used homegrown heirloom tomatoes to make the topping, they’re way tastier than the commercially bred, tough skinned, fast growing ones. It’s a smoky tomato sauce, an unexpected twist on ketchup. On the side, garden greens & locally grown chickpeas from Mt Zero. Healthy, yummy, sustainable.

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  6. Fit for a chef - if only more would consider secondary cuts of meat. Carpaccio of six week, dry aged on the bone Warialda Belted Galloway chuck steak, served with Yea EVO and hot but sweet homegrown wasabi parsley. Magnificent local produce!

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  7. Bó Kho is an underrated Vietnamese dish, or perhaps it’s just yet to be discovered by the fooderati here in Australia. It is an aromatic braise usually made with brisket but it is ideal for most secondary beef cuts.

    Here, I’ve modernised my Grandmother’s recipe by adding barley and keeping my daikon raw for texture - bringing a juicy, peppery crunch to each mouthful. I chose to use Warialda Belted Galloway shin this time, instead of brisket.

    My seasonings for this dish are fennel seeds, cassia bark, star anise, onion and ginger, then fish sauce, homegrown chopped tomato and homemade stock. I finish it with barley, carrots, Kampot pepper and daikon.

    Vietnamese style you would have it with a baguette or a rice noodle soup and an icy cold beer. But as it is rich and complex, I like it served with the acidic crunch of a green mango salad, and garnished with my grandmother’s favourite crisp fried Chinese Crullers, a type of savory doughnut. If you see it on a menu, give it a try.

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  8. Vietnamese beef salad with homegrown greens, herbs and limes, plus enough chilli to raise a sweat on my brow. Thinly sliced nam yu marinated beef from Warialda. Just perfect for a warm Melbourne evening.

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  9. Everyone loves lamb, and it has become expensive. Even lamb shanks, once considered the domain of the poor, are fashionable and costly.

    But it has opened the door to one of my favourite things to eat - goat. Like venison and kangaroo it cannot be cooked in the manner of other meats. Goat needs steam to cook and in return you are rewarded with delicate flavour and texture.

    Here is my newly discovered delectable goat shank curry, cooked in the pressure cooker then finished in the oven. Magic, soft and rich it’s one of my favorites, that calls for a pillow of naan to dredge in the sauce.

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  10. This dish is another that is ethically and deliciously saving the world from food wastage. At home we call it Bum-bum noodles, made with the ‘popes eye’, a muscle around the sphincter.

    The recipe is a basic South East Asian beef with Kampot pepper. I’ve put it with fresh bean shoots and snow peas, a topping of coriander and raw daikon on crisp egg noodles. The sauce seeps into the noodles so that you have a balance of crisp and slippery in the mouth.

    And to eat? If I hadn’t told you I had made it with first world food waste, you’d presume by the flavour and texture that it featured a prime cut.

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  11. A pie. A hearty, rustic pie. Who can resist pastry wrapped morsels? Not many it seems, which is why traditionally they housed braised offcuts, unglamorous cuts of meat and offal.

    So in the spirit of tradition I made pies of rare breed beef - Warialda Belted Galloway of course - but I used cuts considered first world waste. In this instance intercostals - the meat between the ribs - and an ox tongue. The sauce contained garlic, onion, bay leaf, rosemary, mushrooms and red wine.

    It was moist but not dominated by fluid like so many commercial pies stuffed with non-meat fillers. And was densely rich. So filling that I only managed to eat one third. A true traditional hearty pie sufficient to sustain the laboring man.

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  12. My grandfather used to say that it is easy to make a fine dish with expensive ingredients, but only gifted cooks can make a poor man’s food taste irresistible.

    This classic Cantonese dish, beef in oyster sauce, was made with a cut of beef that is considered offal. I used Warialda Belted Galloway pope’s eye, the sphincter muscle. Tasty and succulent it was perfect for the dish.

    Pope’s Eye is best cooked like venison - seared quickly and then well rested before warming by adding into the sauce

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  13. Super taste packed Slow Food sandwiches:

    • Homegrown heirloom variety greens and herbs;
    • Home baked white bread using wholewheat unbleached flour;
    • Producer direct artisan butter and organic quark;
    • Farmer direct organic, sustainable, salmon and rare breed lamb;
    • Mint sauce made with my own chardonnay vinegar and foraged local weeds
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  14. Homemade pulled pork and fresh corn empanada with coriander, ginger, chilli and garlic dipping sauce. A rich, sexy dish, textured with corn kernels and offset with the cool, sharp bite of the dipping sauce. The pulled pork was made with slow braised Wessex Saddleback pork hock sourced from Greenvale Farm.

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  15. Homecooked Seychelles Creole style chicken and cashew curry seasoned with tomato, coconut, ginger and tamarind; dahl and parathas.

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